Topic Archives: CPSC

Rare Court Decision in CPSC-Backed Enforcement Action

A federal district court in Wisconsin recently ruled against a product manufacturer, finding it liable for failing to report timely in a rare U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) backed lawsuit. United States v. Spectrum Brands, Inc., No. 15-CV-371-WMC, 2016 WL 6835371, at *24 (W.D. Wis. Nov. 17, 2016). While CPSC actively oversees voluntary recalls, it seldom brings suit in court. ...›

CPSC
March 22, 2016CPSC

CPSC Pledges Higher Penalties

Earlier this month, CPSC Chair Elliot Kaye told regulators, industry, and lawyers about the CPSC’s priorities for the coming year. At the top of the list were increased civil penalties for failure to report potentially hazardous products. ...›

February 17, 2016Consumer Products, CPSC

Rules Change, and So Does CPSC’s Involvement in the Development of Voluntary Standards

Ever heard of “voluntary” safety standards? Voluntary or not, they’re a big deal. The technical term is “voluntary consensus safety standards” or “non-government consensus standards,” and they may guide the design of your consumer product. In fact, the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) considers voluntary standards “to be a safety floor from which to design ...›

January 14, 2016Consumer Products, CPSC

CPSC Launches “Regulatory Robot”

Businesses face a daunting task when attempting to comply with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) reporting requirements. In an effort to simplify and streamline the process for consumer products providers, CPSC recently launched a “Regulatory Robot” designed “to guide you through . . . identify[ing] important product safety requirements that you should review before manufacturing or importing your consumer product.” ...›

Pay Attention to the Man Behind the Curtain: DOJ Memorandum Adds Further Weight to CPSC Enforcement Efforts Against Corporate Officers

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) recently issued a memorandum to various enforcement agencies. The memorandum, available here, focuses on holding individuals accountable for corporate fraud and misconduct.[1] The DOJ has already shown it means business. Just days after the memorandum was published, a former corporate executive was sentenced to an unprecedented 28 years ...›